ARCA where are they now: Bob Schacht

ARCA where are they now: Bob Schacht

Bob Schacht was a fixture on the ARCA Racing Series presented by Menards scene for nearly a quarter of a century. Starting in the early 1980s through 2016, Schacht scored 19 career ARCA wins. Now 68 years old, Schacht still...
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ARCA Archives 1980-1989

ARCA Archives 1980-1989

1980: The first-ever ARCA events at Michigan Int'l Speedway and Dotter driving cars fielded by Bill Hahnlein to the championship highlight the season. Phil Parsons, Joe Ruttman and Bob Schacht are first-time winners.

1981: ARCA founder and president Marcum dies, clouding the future of the sanctioning body. Marcum's wife Mildred and daughter Suzie Drager, ARCA staff since 1953, accept the offer of long time officials Bob Loga and Rollo Juckette to continue operations and revive the series. The lowest number of series races ever, 8, comprise the '81 schedule. Larry Moyer edges Smith by 10 points for the championship. Tim Richmond wins Daytona, Mark Martin takes Talladega.

1982: Bill France Sr. announces that Talladega Superspeedway will post a $25,000 ARCA driver point fund. Ron Drager joins the ARCA staff in public relations. Scott Stovall wins the series championship in cars fielded by '77 car owner champ Jim Stovall, his father, and sets a record for laps completed percentage at over 99%. Dean Roper wins an ARCA-USAC Stock cosanctioned event at Milwaukee, and Rookie of the Year Lee Raymond gets his first win. Jim Vaughan drives a Jack Bowsher-prepared Ford to Talladega win.

1983: Pocono Int'l Raceway brings ARCA to its 2.5 mile triangle and Bob Schacht wins the first-ever nationally televised ARCA event, seen on ESPN. Davey Allison wins both Talladega races. Rookie of the Year Bill Venturini takes his first series win. Dotter post 3 wins and earns his 2nd championship, this time for car owner Jeff Fortier. DuQuoin State Fairgrounds hosts an ARCA-USAC cosanctioned event won by Roper. Dave Weltmeyer posts first win.

1984: Dotter wins his 3rd series title for the 3rd different car owner, this time Bill Goudie. Davey Allison records the first ARCA 200 mph-plus qualifying speed, at Talladega. Rick Wilson wins Daytona and Venturini and Rookie of the Year Allison tie for 2nd in points. Atlanta Motor Speedway's first ARCA event is won by Allison.

1985: Raymond drives Jim Coyle's Chevrolets to the championship over Venturini. Davey Allison wins at Atlanta and Talladega, where future Indycar champion Danny Sullivan makes his superspeedway debut. Ed Hage pioneers use of the V-6 engine with 3 victories and Schacht wins 3.

1986: Raymond brings Coyle his 4th car owner title, over Dotter. Grant Adcox takes a single-season record 4 superspeedway victories at Daytona, Talladega and Atlanta. Bob Keselowski, Bob Brevak and Bob Strait post their first wins.

1987: Bill Venturini owns the season, winning his first championship after 4 points runnerup finishes. He leads the series with 4 wins and 4 poles, leads the most laps and races and sets an all-time ARCA record with a sizzling 205.432 mph qualifying lap at Talladega. Ralph Jones posts the first Ford win in 5 seasons, and Michael Waltrip wins at Atlanta.

1988: Tracy Leslie wins 4 races and the championship in his rookie season. The first $1 million posted awards season in ARCA Series history. Race attendance exceeds 300,000. Former ARCA driver Jim Clarke joins staff as marketing director. Patty Moise is 1st female driver to win superspeedway pole. Ramo Stott joins Katona as the only drivers to win ARCA events in 3 different decades. Mickey Gibbs wins Daytona and Atlanta. ARCA assumes control of the World Wide Auto Racing (WWAR) Midget Series and formally structures the ARCA Figure-8 Series.

1989: Keselowski is crowned champion, edging Brevak. Keselowski drives Chevrolets owned and crew chiefed by his brother Ron and sponsored by Arnold Jerome-TRW to 4 wins and $98,000 in team earnings top the series. Ben Hess wins Daytona and Atlanta. Ernie Irvan wins Atlanta.
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